Goat Crazy - Keeping Goats Guide is now a Printed Book on Amazon!

by helene on November 18, 2012

At long last!  The ultimate goatkeeping guide "Goat Crazy" is finally available to buy as a printed book from Amazon,

You can also buy it as a Kindle download for your tablet or phone.

And of course, the pdf ebook version, with the bonus cookbook, is still available for instant download from right here!

 

buy kindle download goat keeping book

 

 

buy PRINTED BOOK from Amazon Keeping Goats Guide

About Keeping Goats for Profit

by helene on April 18, 2012

Everyone is familiar with cow’s milk but something that not just everyone knows about is goat’s milk. As it turns out, there are many reasons that someone who has a farm, or at least enough land, might want to invest in goats. Starting right at the top of those reasons is that goat milk is actually much healthier for all living creatures than cow’s milk is.

Once you start to do some research into the subject, you’ll find that there are quite a few people who have made the switch and prefer goat’s milk to that of a cow. Goat’s milk is more easily digested and can, in fact, alleviate many digestive ailments. It’s considered to be a healing type of milk. Even other animals benefit greatly from the properties offered in goat’s milk.

There is a bit of a difference in the taste but it’s not a bad difference. Once most people taste it for the first time, that’s all they usually want to drink when it comes to their choice of milk. It can be used to cook anything that calls for milk as part of the ingredients, and you’ll most likely not even notice the difference in the outcome.

Goat’s milk can also be used to make cheese. This is some of the tastiest cheese you’ll find anywhere. Cheese lovers everywhere search high and low for goat’s cheese because they consider it to be one of the better cheeses. It also carries the same health benefits as the milk.

Something else that goat’s milk is used for is the making of lotions, soap, creams and a variety of other cosmetic products. When made correctly, the goat’s milk provides a lotion that will offer more moisturizers to your skin than anything you may buy in a high end department store. The best thing is that these can be easily made in your very own kitchen.

Depending on your location, you can sell goat’s milk and goat’s milk products through local shops, at your own home, or through the mail. It totally depends on your situation and what works best for you. One thing you can bet on, though, is that once word gets out that you’re selling these things, you’ll be flooded with customers wanting to buy them.

As a side note, goats are quite easy to raise and care for. They’re not as expensive as dairy cows, don’t take up as much room, and are generally easier to clean up after. They love to eat and it’s not expensive to feed them because they will, literally, eat everything. However, if you’re caring for a dairy goat, there’s a special sort of feed that you’ll want to get for her to keep her producing rich, healthy milk.

They’re sweet natured and can be made into pets, only these are pets that earn their keep. Just like cows, they do need to be on a schedule of milking so that they know when to expect it. Also, it keeps the milk coming in at a regular rate. Raising dairy goats is something that provides a good living to many.



Incredible Guide for Keeping Goats Reveals:

All about How To Have the Healthiest, Best Producing, Longest Living Goats in the Land ... Guaranteed Guide for Keeping Goats.

You'll soon have such amazing goats your neighbours will be asking you "How?"


Whether you own goats as pets or for the incredible products that you can get out of them... this book about the best practices for goatkeeping is definitely for you
This Exclusive Goat eBook … is only available here!

Visit HOME PAGE to learn more about this book - you can buy it in ebook, Kindle or Print formats!

 

Keeping Goats | Nigerian Dwarf Goats

by helene on April 18, 2012

The Nigerian Dwarf goat is a miniature dairy goat of West African origin.

Nigerian Dwarves have three different color lines -- black and white, brown, which can be broken with white, and the third is gold, which can also be broken with white. Bucks are to be no more than 23 inches at the withers, and does no more than 21 inches.

Dwarf goats are gentle and lovable. Even breeding bucks are handled easily. They make wonderful pets and great animal projects for young children in 4-H. Breeders of other types of goats find that their Dwarves blend in with the rest of their herd well and do not need special quarters; just adequate fencing to contain them because of their small size.

Dwarf goats breed year round. Many breeders breed their does three times in two years, giving the doe a 6 month plus break. This is of course a personal choice for each breeder.

Kidding is always an exciting time for Dwarf breeders. New babies are too cute! They average about 2 lbs. at birth but grow quickly. Watch out for those little bucks! Those little guys have been known to breed and be fertile as young as 7 weeks of age. Make sure you wean does and bucks separately so this does not happen.

Does can be bred at 7-8 months of age if they have reached good size. Some breeders prefer to wait until they are at least 1 year or older. Dwarf does can have several kids at a time, 3 and 4 being common and sometimes even 5. Dwarf are generally good mothers able to take care of their babies should you leave them to do the raising of the kids.

They can also provide a surprising amount of milk for their size if you decide you want your own delicious goat milk. Bucks are able to be used for service as young as 3 months of age and easily by the time they are 7 or 8 months old. Dwarf bucks are vigorous breeders but are gentle enough to be used for hand breeding or pasture breeding. Both methods are used successfully.

Most breeders feed a 16-18% protein goat feed or dairy ration. It must not contain urea as this is toxic to goats. Free choice grain may be fed to kids via a creep feeder or just whatever they can get "mom" to share. Many breeders give less grain if good pasture and browse is available. Hay or pasture should always be available free choice. Fresh, clean water in clean containers should also be available at all times.

Dwarf goats, like all other breeds, need some basic care for good health and long life.

• Hooves should be trimmed regularly, about every 4- 8 weeks. A properly trimmed hoof should be shaped the same as a kid goats'.

• Vaccination for tetanus, types C&D enterotoxemia are the basic types given. Check with your local vet for further information or other vaccinations recommended for your area.

• Worming should be done several times a year. Your vet can suggest a good schedule for your particular herd's needs.

• Goats should be kept in clean pens free of dampness, drafts and pests like flies and rodents. (not air tight buildings; they need to be well ventilated)

Dwarf goats are registrable in 3 registries. American Goat Society (AGS), International Dairy Goat Registry (IDGR), and Canadian Goat Society (CGS). Dwarf shows are growing in popularity and becoming more and more available. Most are sanctioned by (AGS) and some by an organization that provides alternative sanctioning (NDGA).

 

Keeping Goats | Basic Preventative Care for Healthy Goats

by helene on April 18, 2012

Livestock producers have been breeding for better cattle, sheep, and poultry for decades, but for some reason the concept of raising an improved meat goat eludes a lot of people. If goat producers are ever going to establish broad and stable market demand for their products, then raising a better goat must be the focal point of the plan.

Improved for purposes of this article is defined as a hardy, parasite-tolerant meat goat that has excellent meat-to-bone ratio, grows fast, and requires minimal producer-supplied feed and medical input. For decades, commercial meat-goat producers in places like West Texas have simply gone to an auction house, bought does and a few bucks, and put them out on forage.

They checked on them perhaps once a week, occasionally drenched them with a cheap dewormer, and rounded up what was left in the spring. A 100% kidding ratio (one surviving kid per doe) was considered good. To a large extent, commercial meat-goat production in Texas still follows this outdated pattern.

This is not a recipe for raising quality animals for which premium prices can be charged.

Below are listed minimum requirements necessary in order to raise quality meat goats:

1) Sufficient land over which goats can roam with good forage/browse cover for them to eat.

2) Goat fencing in good repair, with at least three or four pastures for rotational purposes.

3) Clean water supply.

4) Shelter from heavy rain and wind.

5) Good working pens, chutes, and traps.

6) A working knowledge of basic goat nutrition and health. Basic protein, energy, fiber/roughage, and mineral needs must be met, especially for growing kids and pregnant does.

Commitment to provide a basic level of preventative medications for the most commonly-seen health problems.

7) Ability to supplementally feed in times of bad weather and the knowledge needed to know when these conditions exist.

8) Livestock guardian protection; dogs bred for this purpose are usually the most effective.

9) Ability and willingness to check on the goats on a daily basis. Yes, I said daily.

Goats are fairly hardy animals but they are susceptible to several serious life-threatening health problems. Stomach worms, coccidiosis, pneumonia, and overeating disease are the most commonly seen diseases.

Others include but are not limited to tetanus, listeriosis, polioencephalomacia, meningeal deerworm, caseous lymphadenitis, caprine arthritic encephalitis, Johnes disease, tetanus, multiple pregnancy-related diseases, and several nutritionally-related illnesses.

Any producer expecting to achieve maximum profit from his goats needs to perform a level of preventative medical treatment that addresses these problems.

When goats are raised under controlled/managed conditions that limit their access to what they eat and where they roam, the potential for producer-induced problems exists. Checking for worm loads on a regular basis and deworming as needed are critical activities.

Ditto for coccidiosis, especially in young kids. Vaccinating against overeating disease and tetanus is very important, as is providing protection against pneumonia. Colorado Serum Company manufactures more goat-labelled biologics (13) than any other animal health company in the United States.

Take advantage of the availability of these vaccines and vaccinate against overeating disease and tetanus with Essential 3+T (formerly known as Clostridium Perfringens Types C&D Tetanus Toxoid) and against pneumonia with Mannheimia Haemolytica Pasteurella Multocida Bacterin. Both of these products cost pennies per dose and seldom cause injection-site reactions.

Keep a bottle of Colorado Serum's C&D Anti-toxin on hand for those instances when a toxic condition exists and immediate treatment is required. There is no good alternative to C&D Anti-toxin and it will not be readily available or easily found to purchase when your emergency occurs.

In the winter of 2007 or spring of 2008, Colorado Serum's vaccine against Caseous Lymphadenitis in goats should be available. Final trials are underway for FDA submission. Producers should add this product to their preventative medications program.

While CL is not life threatening, it is a management problem that needs to be controlled; this vaccine will go a long way towards getting this nuisance in hand and off the radar as a problem for meat-goat producers.

There are unique problems with pregnant goats that aren't experienced among cattle producers. The very fact that does have multiple kids increases the possibility of complications occurring during the birthing process.

This writer has articles on all of these topics on her website's Articles page at www.tennesseemeatgoats.com, all of which articles have originally been published in Goat Rancher Magazine.


By Suzanne Gasparotto, Onion Creek Ranch.
These articles have previously been published in Goat Rancher Magazine.
http://www.tennesseemeatgoats.com

Important!
Please Read This Notice!
All information provided in these articles is based either on personal experience or information provided by others whose treatments and practices have been discussed fully with a vet for accuracy and effectiveness before passing them on to readers.

In all cases, it is your responsibility to obtain veterinary services and advice before using any of the information provided in these articles. Neither this goat website nor any of the contributors to this website will be held responsible for the use of any information contained herein.

 

Incredible Guide for Keeping Goats Reveals:


All about How To Have the Healthiest, Best Producing, Longest Living Goats in the Land ... Guaranteed Guide for Keeping Goats.

You'll soon have such amazing goats your neighbours will be asking you "How?"


Whether you own goats as pets or for the incredible products that you can get out of them... this book about the best practices for goatkeeping is definitely for you
This Exclusive Goat eBook … is only available here!

Visit HOME PAGE to learn more about this book - you can buy it in ebook, Kindle or Print formats!

Common Skin Diseases In Goats

by helene on April 18, 2012

When keeping goats as pets or for profit, you need to know the fundamental goatkeeping health care steps for things like skin diseased in goats. This keeping goats article will give you great help:

Skin diseases in goats can be classified into four general categories: fungal, parasitic, viral, and bacterial.

Fungal Diseases
Ringworm is the most recognized fungal disease in goats. It is not a worm, but rather a fungus which usually appears during prolonged periods of very wet weather, often when it is difficult to keep the pens clean and therefore disease free.

Ringworm can be located almost anywhere on the goat's body; it appearance is that of a rounded patch of hair surrounded completely by a hairless ring. Left untreated, it gets bigger and bigger. Ringworm is contagious both to goats and to humans.

Treatment involves donning disposable gloves and thoroughly washing the area with a topical skin disinfectant like Betadine Surgical Scrub. Then wipe the cleansed skin surface dry and apply 1% Clotrimazole Cream to the affected area. Repeat this treatment daily for at least two weeks and possibly longer, until the ringworm is gone.

While ringworm doesn't bother the goat or interfere with its habits, it can take up to a month to cure.

Parasitic Diseases
Ticks and Mange (mites) are difficult to eradicate, requiring topical treatment with the appropriate approved insecticide every two to three weeks until evidence of infection is gone.

Lice infestation is not uncommon in goats. Oftentimes, only one or two animals have them. If a goat has a scruffy goat and has been recently wormed, it is a good bet that lice are the culprits. There are two types of lice, biting and blood-sucking, and microscopic examination is necessary to determine which kind is present on the goat.

Treatment, however, is similar, so assume it is the blood-sucking kind that will cause anemia if left uncontrolled and treat immediately with Synergized De-Lice or similar product topically. For lactating goats, choose one of several products on the market (permethrins) that has no withdrawal time.

Keds is a wingless blood-sucking fly that burrows into the skin of the goat. Insecticides used for louse control are also effective against Keds.

Screw Worms are fly maggots that are deposited into body openings or wounds. Usage of fly repellents and insecticides cut down on the likelihood of screw worm infestation. A screw worm deposit should be cleaned out with a mild solution of pine oil or similar product and a topical antibiotic like Triple Antibiotic Cream applied until the infected area is healed.

Viral Diseases
Soremouth (contagious ecthyma) is a common viral disease afflicting goats. In most cases, it is not debilitating.

However, the appearance of soremouth in a herd when young kids are nursing can be disastrous. Soremouth (sometimes called Orf) affects mucous membranes such as lips and teats, making nursing difficult and sometimes causing the dam to reject her kids because nursing is painful to her.

In such situations, the death of kids can occur. Blisters appear, usually on the goat's lips, and when they scab over and ultimately drop off, the ground becomes infected.

Recent evidence reveals that some goats may be carriers of the disease. The good news is that once a goat has had soremouth, it will not catch the disease again. The bad news is that once a producer's property is infected with Soremouth, it is there forever.

Treat Soremouth with topical application of Gentian Violet, an old-time remedy that is both cheap and effective. Ask for it behind the pharmacy counter. Wear disposable gloves, since Soremouth is zoonotic (contagious to humans) and Gentian Violet stains purple. Some producers use Tea Tree Oil, WD-40, and a variety of improvised products to dry up the blisters so that they scab over and the goat can eat without discomfort again.

A live virus vaccine exists to prevent Soremouth. The downside is that if a herd doesn't already have Soremouth, the vaccine will introduce it to them. Producers will have to decide for themselves whether they wish to vaccinate against Soremouth. This writer chooses not to do so.

Caprine Herpesvirus is occasionally seen in goats and generally has to run its course. Be aware that this virus, if present in pregnant does, is likely to cause abortions.

In these cases, high fever accompanies the Herpesvirus infection. There is a genital form that is believed to be venereal, but bucks do not have to show obvious signs of infection in order to spread Herpesvirus. Oddly enough, neither the goats' ability to reproduce nor their conception rates are negatively affected by this disease.
Bacterial Diseases

Staphylococci bacteria often invade skin lesions on goats. Infection can be generalized over large areas of the goat's body or localized in the form of pustules on a doe's udder.

Generalized infections should be treated with long-lasting Benzathine Penicillin (five cc's per one hundred pounds of body weight for five consecutive days), in combination with cleansing the affected area thoroughly with chlorhexidine shampoo or Betadine Surgical Scrub. Then apply an antibiotic cream topically. For localized infections such as the surface of the udder, the antibiotic treatment can be eliminated and the cleansing/antiobiotic cream regimen can be solely used.

This article is by no means a complete list of all the skin diseases which can affect goats. It is intended to provide producers with an overview of the most commonly seen caprine skin diseases


By Suzanne Gasparotto, Onion Creek Ranch.
These articles have previously been published in Goat Rancher Magazine.
http://www.tennesseemeatgoats.com


Important!
Please Read This Notice!
All information provided in these articles is based either on personal experience or information provided by others whose treatments and practices have been discussed fully with a vet for accuracy and effectiveness before passing them on to readers.
In all cases, it is your responsibility to obtain veterinary services and advice before using any of the information provided in these articles. Neither this goat website nor any of the contributors to this website will be held responsible for the use of any information contained herein.

 

 

Incredible Guide for Keeping Goats Reveals:


All about How To Have the Healthiest, Best Producing, Longest Living Goats in the Land ... Guaranteed Guide for Keeping Goats.

You'll soon have such amazing goats your neighbours will be asking you "How?"


Whether you own goats as pets or for the incredible products that you can get out of them... this book about the best practices for goatkeeping is definitely for you
This Exclusive Goat eBook … is only available here!

Visit HOME PAGE to learn more about this book - you can buy it in ebook, Kindle or Print formats!

Keeping Goats: Learn about Pet Goat care

by helene on April 18, 2012

For those who have goats as pets it is very important for them to take care of these pets.
They need very particular feed, not the rubbish you often associate with ‘goats will eat anything’.

A pet goat also needs good shelter for all seasons and fencing to keep it healthy. There are also many goat health problems that you need to be aware of, and prevent in advance.

For such extensive care there are many books, manuals, and websites etc. that provide tips for complete goat care. These sources guide you to keep your goats in the best of health.

A good manual would even help you to start your own goat farm with healthy goats. And thus you would generate more profits as a goat farmer.

And if you have pet goats because you need their daily products, you need expert advice to help you transform your poor milking goats into healthy and productive dairy goats.

Anybody keeping goats as pets needs to feel confident that they know how to best care for their precious pets. Without good advice, you can easily end up not only with a goat in trouble, but also very expensive vet care bills. You want to enjoy the experience of having a pet goat, so make sure you learn as much as possible about their feeding and care.

So you need to find the manuals that can teach you how you identify the health problems with goats, prevent them where possible. Like tips on how to avoid poisonous plants that could be fatal for your pet goat.

They give a view of some of the important life saving questions that one must keep in mind before keeping goats. For instance, will you be de-horning your goat, to keep your kids safer around it?

Then you will need detailed instructions and help to do this safely. Will you be breeding your goat? Then you need expert guidance in the whole process, right through to the birth.

Are you keeping a pet goat because you need the milk? Then you will need help in creating milking cycles that would work to your benefit.

One can even discover different fencing types which would save on a great amount of money as well as time. These even give you tips on how you can earn money by extracting wool out of these pet goats.

If you have not already selected your pet goat, a good goatkeeping guide would even suggest what kind of goats would be suit a person in accordance to his/her requirements.

Don’t make the simple mistakes so many people do when they first start keeping goats. Be prepared from the very start with all the information you will need.

If you are thinking of starting a goat farm, you would need to be an expert on milk yearling, dry yearling etc. among many, many other subjects on keeping goats healthy and profitable for your business.

And from a good manual you would know how to treat any kind of illness or injuries that may occur so that your farm stays profitable from the very beginning.

Such tips could fetch you good profits. A good manual about keeping goats also help you in maintaining breeding and birthing for healthy kid and nanny. Such tips are essential for those who want to breed goats and suggest how to take care of the kid right after their birth.

These essential goat care guides suggest how one can deal with health problems especially during the goat’s pregnancy and birthing period without paying heavy veterinary bills. If you follow the advice in a good comprehensive guide for keeping a pet goat or starting a goat farm, you will know exactly how to raise healthy goats without spending much and would be able to earn great profits as a goat farmer.

Keeping a pet goat can be very exciting and rewarding, as they make great pets and are very intelligent and affectionate. It is a long-term commitment you are making, as goats live many years, and deserve your best care and attention for all of their lives. Be like the famous Boy Scouts and “Be Prepared” at all times, for all eventualities, by being informed and well educated in the care of your pet goat. Then you will all be both happy and healthy in the many years to come.


buy book on goat care

Incredible Guide for Keeping Goats Reveals:


All about How To Have the Healthiest, Best Producing, Longest Living Goats in the Land ... Guaranteed Guide for Keeping Goats.

You'll soon have such amazing goats your neighbours will be asking you "How?"


Whether you own goats as pets or for the incredible products that you can get out of them... this book about the best practices for goatkeeping is definitely for you
This Exclusive Goat eBook … is only available here!

Visit HOME PAGE to learn more about this book - you can buy it in ebook, Kindle or Print formats!

FEEDING GOATS PROPERLY

by helene on April 18, 2012

FEEDING GOATS PROPERLY
Garbage In - Garbage Out

In their natural habitat, goats range freely over many acres, consuming a wide variety of high-quality forage and browse.

Being both ruminants and herbivores with fast metabolisms, goats must eat continually, concentrating on the best selection of weeds and leaves available to them. Goats are not the 'tin-can eaters' portrayed in Saturday morning cartoons.

Their digestive systems are sensitive and fine tuned.
Roughage is essential to the goat's diet. Dry matter roughage (long fiber, i.e. grass hay and dry forage/browse) is essential for proper rumen function.

Goats digest their food with live bacteria. A generous combination of live bacteria and grass hay is an essential building block towards establishing a healthy rumen. As the day wears on, the rumen grows larger as the goat eats more long fiber.

The producer can actually see the rumen expand as the day passes. A large rumen is not an indication of a fat goat; instead, it is indicative of a good digestive factory.

Note: Bloated goats have large rumens, but they are tight and hard, rather than the spongy-feeling-to-the-touch sides of a healthy goat.
Goats were not meant to be penned and intensively fed grain products. Herbivores cannot digest much high-protein feed.

The part not digested either leaves the goat's body as urine or feces, or causes health problems like urinary calculi, ruminal acidosis, ketosis (in pregnant does), hypocalcemia ("milk fever") in lactating does, bloat, founder, or other rumen-related illnesses. Improper levels of protein, vitamins, minerals, and nitrogen can also contribute to breeding and kidding problems.

See this author's website's Articles Page for treatises on these topics.
Goats do not marble fat throughout the meat as cattle do. Instead, fat layers around vital internal organs (heart, kidneys, liver), impairing their optimum function.

Continual overfeeding of grain products will not only cause the health problems listed above, but will also damage the goat's bones and entire skeletal system. Mega-calorie feeding will add gross weight to a goat, but the bones cannot grow fast enough to carry the weight.

Show-goat bucks that survive such intensive feed regimens and live to four or five years of age are often seen walking on their front knees because their bone growth has not kept pace with the massive body weight that it is required to carry.

Gout-like symptoms are not uncommon in surviving older show goats.
Creep feeding of grains is not recommended for any goat, kid or adult. Creep-feeding, to this author, means offering grain free-choice 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

If the producer must offer grain because of limited forage availability, then do so in limited quantities, remove anything left after 15 minutes, and offer less the next day.

Note: Some producers believe that they can creep feed successfully. This writer thinks that most people raising goats, particularly those new to the industry, should stay away from this feeding methodology.

There are too many variables that can kill goats; here are but two examples: Feeding textured feed (horse-and-mule type feeds) in hot and moist climates can result in mold and induce listeriosis, and (2) Offering grains like shelled or cracked corn can cause bloat or ruminal acidosis.

Too many telephone calls and emails come my way with problems resulting from creep feeding for this goat producer to endorse it. The biggest problem with creep feeding is massive over-feeding of sacked feed.

Many sacked feed labels recommend feeding far in excess of the amount that an individual goat should eat. Remember that these companies are in the business of selling feed rather than raising quality meat goats.

The conversion rate of feed-to-muscle (meat) in goats is inefficient; it takes about eight pounds of feed to produce one pound of meat. It is neither healthy for the goats nor for the producer's bank account to sack feed the goats on a regular basis. Supplementation is necessary in bad weather, but forage/browse is where goats need to be the majority of their lives.

The producer, however, must make sure that his goats are not overcrowded and that sufficient quality forage/browse is available for them. It seems that goat breeders wind up on both ends of the spectrum, either over-feeding or under-feeding. Finding that right balance is the necessary goal in order to raise healthy goats.

Other than death caused by slaughter or predators, the third-ranking killer of goats is, in this writer's opinion, producers who improperly feed their (usually confined) animals. Goats are not intended to be fat animals.

A layman's method of checking for excess body fat on a goat is to try to 'pinch an inch' of fat where the goat's front leg meets its body.

Indeed, one of the main attractions of goat meat to consumers is that it is lower in fat and calories than white meats or other red meats.
Think of goats as 'first cousins' to deer.

Goats range and forage like deer, eating the same types of plants. Because goats are not naturally resistant to stomach worms, they eat 'from the top down.'

Wherever goats forage heavily, a browse line will be present, above which the forage is intact and below which the goats have obviously eaten. Trying to make grazing animals of goats invites worm infestation. Goats will eat grasses, but only when other, more nutritious weeds and leaves are not available.


If there is not a retailer or mill producing feed made specifically for goats in your area, then find a qualified nutritionist familiar with the types of feed that goats require and utilize his services.

Do not try to mix feed yourself. Most of us raising goats, this writer included, do not have the knowledge or experience to formulate a good feed ration.

Proper nutrition is a complex issue. Do not rely on persons experienced in cattle or sheep nutrition. Goats are not 'little cows, ' and sheep have distinctly different nutritonal needs from goats.

The percentage of protein in a feed ration is just one of the factors to be considered. Most prepared feeds are too high in protein.

There are several types of protein . . . . soluable (digestable) and bypass (indigestable) being two of them . . . and how they interact with the goat's digestive system is of paramount importance to the animal's health. When reading feed labels, find out exactly what comprises the "crude protein" indicated on the bag or block.

Rule of Thumb: Cheaper (less 'useable' by the goat's body) ingredients equal feed that you should not want to offer your goats. Properly-formulated rations will be better utilized by the goat, thereby costing the producer less in the long run.

Ammonium chloride and urea are non-protein nitrogens, and both products are often over-used. Ammonium chloride is used in the (hopeful) prevention of urinary calculi, despite the fact that its usage can cause an excess of urea in the liver and kidneys.

While this author often hears that urea can be successfully fed to goats, she maintains that goat producers need to avoid feeding urea unless they have employed a goat nutritionist who is very familiar with how to properly use it.

Correct amounts of vitamins and minerals are critical to cycling, breeding, birthing, and even hair color and texture. Goat nutritionists know which minerals in what forms bind up other minerals and prevent their proper functioning. Energy is one more element requiring consideration in a proper feeding regimen.

Nitrogen levels in most prepared feeds are too high for goats. Changes in climatic conditions affect what the goat needs to eat to remain healthy.

Forage, browse, and pasture affected by drought will put higher levels of nitrates/nitrites into plants, increasing the likelihood of nitrate/nitrite toxicity. If the processed feed being offered to the goats is also high in nitrates or nitrites, this can be a deadly combination.

Begin your search for the right feed formulation for your goats with an analysis of the soil on your property. This is your base line for mineral and vitamin availability upon which to build your customized feed ration.

Have your hay tested for nutrient content so that you can offer a well-balanced menu to your animals.

Find a qualified goat nutritionist, even if he is located outside your area, and pay him to formulate a quality feeding program for your goats, taking into account the soil conditions, nutritional content of hay, and ingredients readily available in your area with which to formulate a feed ration suitable for your goats.

Contact your local agricultural extension office or county agent for assistance and referrals. Better yet, join ChevonTalk, this author's 1100+ member meat-goat discussion group, and ask subscribing goat producers for references in your specific area.

Confining goats into pens and small pastures dramatically increases their exposure to worms. Pasture rotation is vital in any goat-producing operation. The life cycle of a stomach worm (Haemonchus contortus . . . the stomach worm most commonly affecting goats) is only three weeks.

At least four pastures are needed on any goat ranch so that the producer can remove goats from the first pasture and leave them off it for at least nine weeks.

This timeframe does not insure that stomach worms will be gone when the goats return to the first pasture, but it is certainly helpful. Some producers run a small herd of cattle behind their goats to clean up the pastures. The goat producer's first axiom is: Permanent pasture equals parasites.

How to Determine the Age of Your Goat

by helene on April 18, 2012

Determining the age of a goat is easy to do for the first few years of its life. The procedure is called toothing a goat.

A goat has no teeth in the upper front of its mouth, but it has eight teeth in the lower front. The size and condition of these eight teeth is the best gauge to determine the goat's age.

A goat is born with eight baby teeth in the lower front gum. All eight teeth are similarly small sized. When the goat approaches a year of age, give or take a few months, the two center front baby teeth are replaced by two permanent teeth.

Therefore, a goat with only two permanent teeth is called a two-toother and is considered at least one year old.

The same procedure occurs again as the goat approaches two years of age. The next two baby teeth, one on each side of the two permanent teeth, are replaced by two more permanent teeth.

This goat is called a four-toother and is two years of age. A goat who is between one year of age and two years old is called coming two's.

At three years of age, the third set of two teeth, one on each side of the permanent teeth, is replaced by permanent teeth, and this goat is now a six-toother.

Soon it will be coming three's, age-wise. And the last two baby teeth become permanent teeth as the goat approaches four years of age, hence the animal is an eight-toother.

From age four onward, the process for determining the goat's age becomes less precise and an exact age is difficult to determine. As the goat grows older, the teeth begin to buck out and spread.

By the time the goat is ten years old, the teeth are generally pretty worn . . . . depending upon what the goat has been fed or how tough its forage has been or whatever injuries the goat may have sustained to its mouth during its lifetime.


Summary:
One year old = two permanent teeth (two-toother)
Two years old = four permanent teeth (four-toother)
Three years old = six permanent teeth (six-toother)
Four years old = eight permanent teeth (eight-toother)
Older than four years of age is pretty much a guess.


By the way, don't assume that because a goat has no teeth in the upper front gum that there are no grinding teeth in the upper jaw. A goat has some ferocious grinding teeth in both upper and lower jaws. Stick your fingers in there and that goat will make mincemeat of them!



By Suzanne Gasparotto, Onion Creek Ranch.
These articles have previously been published in Goat Rancher Magazine.
http://www.tennesseemeatgoats.com
Important!
Please Read This Notice!
All information provided in these articles is based either on personal experience or information provided by others whose treatments and practices have been discussed fully with a vet for accuracy and effectiveness before passing them on to readers.

 


Incredible Guide for Keeping Goats Reveals:


All about How To Have the Healthiest, Best Producing, Longest Living Goats in the Land ... Guaranteed Guide for Keeping Goats.

You'll soon have such amazing goats your neighbours will be asking you "How?"


Whether you own goats as pets or for the incredible products that you can get out of them... this book about the best practices for goatkeeping is definitely for you
This Exclusive Goat eBook … is only available here!

Visit HOME PAGE to learn more about this book - you can buy it in ebook, Kindle or Print formats!

Christmas Gifts for your Goat!

by helene on April 18, 2012

If there is a fellow goat keeper on your gift list How about giving them a batch of goat cookie treats (for their goats to eat). Here is my favorite recipe:

Small batch
3 cups of grain (I use cracked barley or oats)
9.5 ounces of molasses
1 cup of whole wheat flour


Large batch
15 cups of grain (I use cracked barley or oats)
48 ounces of molasses
5 cups whole wheat flour

Mix together adding a small amount of water (making a stiff batter) Spray cookie sheets with cooking oil. Make into small balls. Bake at 350 degrees for about 20 minutes or until they appear done.

The amount of grain can be reduced and raisins, apple, carrot or other favorite item may be substituted.

For people you think would like some simple Goat Milk Soap for Gifts this Christmas!

¾ of a pound of grated soap (homemade or store bought) soften over low heat.

Gradually add in 9 oz of goat milk.

When soap is completely melted, add 2 tsp. powdered benzoin and several drops of fragrance (optional).

Pour into mold and allow to dry completely.




For additional information:
Sandra Mauerhan The Rocking M Ranch http://www.therockingm.com

POB 252 Barksdale, TX 78828 rockingm@ricc.net
http://www.therockingm.com

 

Incredible Guide for Keeping Goats Reveals:


All about How To Have the Healthiest, Best Producing, Longest Living Goats in the Land ... Guaranteed Guide for Keeping Goats.

You'll soon have such amazing goats your neighbours will be asking you "How?"


Whether you own goats as pets or for the incredible products that you can get out of them... this book about the best practices for goatkeeping is definitely for you
This Exclusive Goat eBook … is only available here!

Visit HOME PAGE to learn more about this book - you can buy it in ebook, Kindle or Print formats!

 

Cost of raising a goat

Here are the approximate costs of items needed for raising a goat in Southern California.

Costs will vary and are usually much less in more rural areas.

• Purchase price: Expect to pay between $100 and $300 for a registered Dairy Goat kid and between $150 and $350 for a Pygmy Goat.

• Feed: The cost of alfalfa hay in Southern California varies between $9 and $12 per bale, depending on the season and the feed store.

Grain costs about $9 per 50 pound bag. One mature dairy goat eats approximately 1 bale of hay every 2 weeks.

• Supplies:
o Collar $6
o Insecticide powder $7
o Hoof trimmers $14
o Milking bucket $20 - $30
o Grooming brush $4
o Kid nipples 60 cents



• Medications:
o Tetanus antitoxin $2 for vial for three kids
o Worming medication $8 - $15 for 10 to 20 doses


• Procedures:
o Stud service $25 to $75
o Disbudding $10 at Farm; $35 with a vet
o CAE blood test $6
o Stool sample $12 to $16 through a veterinarian

 

Post archives

No blog archives

Post categories

No blog categories